Why Are Children on the Pill? (as published by PRG)

Doctors prescribing contraceptives to 11-year-olds
I read recently that children as young as 11 are taking the contraceptive pill in the UK. The statistics in last week’s Sunday Times stated that more than 1000 girls aged 11-12 are on the pill, a fivefold increase in the past decade. A further 200 girls aged between 11-13 have long-term injectable contraceptive devices. Read the rest

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2 thoughts on “Why Are Children on the Pill? (as published by PRG)

  1. At 11 I still thought boys were smelly and stinky lol (Come to think of it they are still smelly and stinky lol)

    Anyhoo maybe it was the way I was brought up but even at 19 or 20 when I went to talk to my GP about the pill and other forms of contraception I was soooo embarassed. (I’ll point out I had a male GP – he was the same GP I’ve been seeing since I was little.)

    In the end I had to come off the the pill because it made me ill, gave me headaches , made me paranoid and in general a real meanie to be around. If I was 11 and taking the pill and all that had happened I would have had no friends left. At 11 you are discovering who you want to be and where you want to go in your life (then again I am still doing that at 24 lol) but boys should be one of the last things on your mind surely? I’ve been watching Underage and Pregnant on BBC3 and some of their reasoning either for having underage intercourse or for being pregnant are often really strange – and often quite selfish in some episodes

    I will leave my rant there lol. On the other hand I ask the question if 11 year olds are taking the pill does that reduce or increase the rate of teen pregnancies? What can we do to lower the rate of teen pregnancy seeing as teaching celibacy in schools is so taboo?

    • See, that’s interesting because a lot of people say the generations are growing up faster now but your attitude is exactly the same as mine.

      It is all down to education – by parents and teachers. Sex eduction wasn’t on the agenda when we were that young and if it wasn’t now, the question wouldn’t rear it’s ugly head and ‘children’ wouldn’t feel pressurised into doing something they shouldnt even be thinking about until (at least) 16

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